Gossip in the Garden

Harmony in the Garden's Chattier Side

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Glaucous & Purple – a color combo that adds some ‘oomph’ to your garden

 

I bet many of you are thinking ‘what the heck is glaucous, anyway?’

Well, according to Webster, glaucous means:

  1.  of a pale yellow-green color, or of a light bluish-gray or bluish-white color

      2. having a powdery or waxy coating that gives a frosted appearance and tends to rub off

And here’s a fun-fact from Wikipedia: the first recorded use of glaucous as the name of a color was in the year 1671.

So, while this word has been around for hundreds of years, it still eludes many gardeners.

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I wonder if it’s partly because it’s such an unattractive sounding word (sounding like something stuck in the throat.)

Or maybe it’s because the definitions are a little all over the place: is it pale yellow-green?  Or light bluish-gray?  Or, bluish-white?  Frosty?  Powdery? Hmmm…

Whatever the reason, one of my favorite color combos of all time is glaucous and purple/maroon/burgundy, all nestled together.

There are a few reasons why this combination works so well.

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Previous Articles:
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