Gossip in the Garden

Harmony in the Garden's Chattier Side

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Wordless Wednesday – Succulent People

Having spent a delightful morning touring the San Diego Botanical Garden last week, I must admit I was most smitten by these life-size topiaries.

Pat Hammer, Director of Operations of the Botanical Garden, created these incredible works of art, going so far as making clay masks of some of the members of the garden and Horticultural Society to use as their faces!

Amazing, don’t you think?

 

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22 Responses to Wordless Wednesday – Succulent People

  1. Hi Rebecca!
    I just found your blog! As a succulent lover myself and I have admired the photos taken at this beautiful garden. Especially of these succulent ladies! Absolutely stunning. I had not seen the second one. Those huge echeveria ‘after glow’ (I think) on her skirt are so beautiful! Someday I would like to see this wonderful place. Thank you for showing us!

  2. Wow! I just got off the phone with Margaret Jones – I was telling her about an article I saw in Dirt du jour about this amazing succulent art and she said, “I working on them right now!” She directed me to this link for more details….I keep forgetting that Quail Gardens changed to San Diego Botanical Garden!
    Now, I am even more excited to take a road trip with my garden club friends to see San Diego Botanical Garden and Margaret’s amazing work! She is slowly removing the ivy and replacing it with different succulents to “dress the form”. If she doesn’t like how it turns out, she tries some other succulent! Her favorite is the dancing girl – exquisite! Margaret is an inspiration and artist!

    • What timing, right Darla! The more people who comment about these beautiful works of art points out an important fact – it takes a village to create a masterpiece in the garden (or something like that!!). Pat, Margaret, Debra and all the other docents who help with the topiaries always-changing succulent ‘wardrobe’ have my complete admiration. I hope to meet some of them in person someday!

  3. How wonderful so many people are enjoying our topiary. For the record, these figures were originally created for the Philadelphia Flower Show in 2003 and they were covered with many cultivars of Hedera helix. http://www.srtopiary.com/phil_flower_show.html When they returned to California they traveled around to several other venues including the San Diego County Fair in 2003. When I closed Samia Rose Topiary in 2005 and joined the staff at the San Diego Botanic Garden I brought my favorite topiary with me. They were like part of my staff. Actually, many of the faces are cast from my SRT staff so each of these figures are like good friends. However, I must give credit to the SDBG Topiary Team made up of all volunteers and led by Margaret Jones. Inspired by the work of Margee Rader and Debra Lee Baldwin our volunteers set out to replant them one by one with succulents which require much less maintenance here in southern California. I hope everyone will visit the San Diego Botanic Garden and continue to watch our progress.

    • How wonderful you stopped by, Pat, I’m truly honored! And thank you so much for giving us all a little more information about your beautiful works of art. I love hearing about their transformation from ivy to succulents. So similar to gardens which are always undergoing some form of change.

  4. Those are absolutely magnificent, thanks for sharing. I surely wish those succulents were winter hardy for me, but alas not.

    • I’m so sorry, Susy. I think I’d just die if I wasn’t able to plant at least a few succulents. Are you sure even the super cold-hardy varieties of sempervivums or small-leaf sedums wouldn’t survive?? Might be worth a try? My parent’s home is in Lake Tahoe, and some of the sempervivums regularly covered with 10′ of snow and I’m always amazed that they come back stronger than ever in the spring!

  5. The pictures are wonderful and yes Pat Hammer designed them and made them. At first they were planted with ivy and were used in various places such as the fair. Since Pat put them in San Diego Botanic Garden the docents have slowly changed them to succulents. A mention needs to be made on their hard work and artistry!

    • You’re absolutely right, Bette! As a landscape designer, it’s one thing to create and install a beautiful garden but it’s those who maintain it throughout the years that sometimes deserve as much credit! Thanks for letting me know who maintains them!

  6. These are just wonderful! I also enjoyed your last post on black plants. I usually do not incorporate black in my landscape, but I am leaning toward some of the darker plantings like Euphorbia Blackbird and the Ninebarks, Dark Horse Weigela, etc.

    Eileen

    • Thanks Eileen – I think you’ll be pleased with the ‘shadow-y’ element dark plants can give to a planting bed, creating depth when there isn’t any, etc. I’ve had the best luck with the euphorbias in a 5-gallon vs. a 1-gallon size. Seems they’re hardier that way.

    • Yes, the masks add a whole other dimension to these topiaries, don’t they? That one guy looks downright angry! I probably wouldn’t be too happy either if I had clay all over my face. Still, they’re pretty darn awesome and you should definitely check this place out. It was probably the best botanical garden I’ve seen yet.